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This museum exists thanks to the Japanese archaeologist known as 'Amano', who worked at restoring archaeological remains with his own hands.

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Fundación Museo Amano (Amano Museum Foundation)

You'll be amazed.

La Fundación Museo Amano' has a surprising origin: the tenacity and the hobby of a Japanese businessman settled in Peru, named 'Yoshitaro Amano'. He travelled all over the country during the middle of the twentieth century to look for pre-Columbian archaeological remains in order to restore them by hand in his house, trusting that someday they could be exposed to the Peruvian society in this way. Reports inform that the gravediggers of the tombs were warned to conserve parts that were apparently less valuable than the jewels: "when you find ceramics or looms, do not destroy them: here comes a crazy Japanese man who pays for them". This was how the 'Museo Amano' was born and opened in 1964 with about five thousand pre-Hispanic objects and a new discovery: the Chancay civilization (from the 12th to the 15th centuries A.D.), which had gone unnoticed by the Peruvian archaeologists, and was discovered by Mr. Amano as a result of his independent research.



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